The Small Catechism of Martin Luther by Philip Hoppe

Pastor Philip Hoppe has made a very nice use of Prezi to introduce people to the Small Catechism. Any Lutheran will find handy uses for this with fellow church members, family, friends, online acquaintances, and others.

Transcript of The Small Catechism

The Small Catechism
A book of questions and answers that answers briefly the question, “What does the Bible teach?”
Written by Martin Luther because he found most people did not know the basics of the faith.
Written for fathers and pastors to teach their familes and flocks.
What is the Small Catechism?
Shows how God’s people are to live.
Reveals that we do not live as we should.
Leads us to despair of earning our own salvation.
Leaves us in need of a Savior outside of ourselves.
The Ten Commandments
Reveals to us our Savior God
Reveals to us that he is Triune, three persons in one God.
The Father creates, The Son redeems, The Holy Spirit sanctifies

The Creed
Teaches us about life with God.
Teaches us how to talk to our Heavenly Father.
Tells us what is important in this world and the next.
Teaches us how God first brings us the salvation Jesus won for us at the cross.
Reveals that our old man has been killed.
Reveals that a new man has been raised up to live a new life.
The Sacrament of
Holy Baptism
Reminds us what to do with the sins that continue after Baptism
Reminds us that pastors are given to us in order that forgiveness might be delivered to us so that we can live with a clear conscience.
Confession
Assures us that Christ comes to us in his Body and Blood
Reveals to us why weekly gathering to receive this gift is critical to faith.
Proclaims Christ’s death until He comes.
The Lord’s Supper
Daily Prayers
Morning
Evening
Asking a Blessing
Returning Thanks
Table of Duties
Pastor and People
Government and Citizens
Husbands and Wives
Parents and Children
Bosses and Employees
Youth
Widows
Everyone
Christian Questions
with Their Answers
A series of questions that leads one through what the catechism has taught them about faith and life in preparation for receiving the Lord’s Supper.
The Lord’s Prayer

 

HT, T.R. Halverson, lutherancatechism.com

Global Lutheran Education: Be An International Partner!

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International Partners

International Partners (IP) is building on the success of ILT’s International Educational Ministries, listening to and working with Lutheran leaders in Asia, Africa and the Americas, and translating that mission back to our partners. Hence, an International Partner is either an overseas denomination, or an individual/congregation/non-profit that desires to receive or to help provide Lutheran theological education.

In 2015, as part of ILT’s certificate program, we launched international education, beginning with the Lutheran Church of South Sudan, then in India, followed by three countries in Southeast Asia. IP is training pastors and church workers there and has been invited to work in more countries, which can begin once we have additional contributors.

International Partners’ mission is to address the growing demand for international education and connect with sponsors who envision a faithful, growing Lutheran church. Together we are working to:

  • Provide teachers and curriculum to train pastors, evangelists and church workers

  • Train and credential seminary faculty of partner international seminaries

  • Train international students currently in North America

  • Encourage collaboration between mission groups and cultivate support for partner projects

Our financial need is to raise $110,000 in the first year. Funds are designated for development of a basic curriculum of eight courses, scholarships, ministry projects for select students, travel and staffing.

We believe the future growth of the Lutheran Church in the long term is in Africa, Asia and the Americas.  If you have a vision and can grasp the opportunities for Lutheran mission around the world we invite you to partner with us in this vision. Please consider this prayerfully.

Find more info on the areas of the globe where we are at work here.

Concerning Christian Liberty by Martin Luther


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“Thus from faith flow forth love and joy in the Lord, and from love a cheerful, willing, free spirit, disposed to serve our neighbour voluntarily, without taking any account of gratitude or ingratitude, praise or blame, gain or loss. Its object is not to lay men under obligations, nor does it distinguish between friends and enemies, or look to gratitude or ingratitude, but most freely and willingly spends itself and its goods, whether it loses them through ingratitude, or gains goodwill. For thus did its Father, distributing all things to all men abundantly and freely, making His sun to rise upon the just and the unjust. Thus, too, the child does and endures nothing except from the free joy with which it delights through Christ in God, the Giver of such great gifts.”

-Martin Luther, Concerning Christian Liberty

“Going Viral with the Gospel” conference will explore what it means to proclaim the gospel in today’s world.

The Institute of Lutheran Theology invites you for serious theological reflection on the topic of evangelism. Under the title, “Going Viral with the Gospel,” we will explore what it means to proclaim the gospel in today’s world.
Main Presenters

  • Dr. Dennis Bielfeldt
  • Dr. Eugene Bunkowske
  • Rev. Kip Tyler

Breakout sessions will be led by graduates from ILT!

  • Dave Wollan
  • John Lewis
  • Becky Hand
 
 

Pricing

  • $100 – Conference Registration
  • $50 – Student
  • $50 – Emeritus Pastor

(Any person who registers before September 1 will receive a free T-shirt.)

Are you unable to come in person? Order the DVD for yourself, or to share with your church! The DVD will include full conference coverage of the speakers and breakout sessions. Special features will include additional interviews and a sneak peak at future ILT events!

$25 – Conference DVD

Contact Info:
 
Or, visit us at  www.ilt.org

The Meaning Behind Luther’s Rose

Coburg Castle, 1530 Honorable, kind, dear Sir and Friend! Grace and Peace in Christ!

Since you ask whether my seal has come out correctly, I shall answer most amiably and tell you of those thoughts which now come to my mind about my seal as a symbol of my theology.  There is first to be a cross, black, and placed in a heart, which should be of its natural color (red), to put me in mind that faith in Christ crucified saved us. For if one believes from the heart, he will be justified. [“For it is by believing in your heart that you are made right God, and it is by confessing with your mouth that you are saved.”  –Romans 10:10] Even though it is a black cross, which mortifies and which also should hurt us, yet it leaves the heart in its natural color and does not ruin nature…that is, the cross does not kill, but keeps man alive. For the just shall live by faith, by faith in the Savior. [“This Good News tells us how God makes us right in His sight.  This is accomplished from start to finish by faith.  As the Scriptures say, ‘It is through faith that a righteous person has life.'”  –Romans 1:17]

Such a heart is to be in the midst of a white rose, to symbolize that faith gives joy, comfort, and peace.  In a word, it places the believer into a white joyful rose, for this faith does not give peace and joy as the world gives. [“I am leaving you with a gift–peace of mind and heart.  And the peace I give isn’t like the peace the world gives.  So don’t be troubled or afraid.”  –John 14:27] Therefore, the rose is to be white, not red, for white is the color of the spirits and of all angels.  [“..an angel of the Lord came down from heaven and rolled aside the stone and sat on it.  His face shone like lightening, and his clothing was as white as snow.” –Matthew 28:2b-3  and  “She saw two white-robed angels sitting at the head and foot of the place where the body of Jesus had been lying.”  –John 20:12]

This rose, moreover, is fixed in a sky-blue field, symbolizing that such joy in the Spirit and in faith is a beginning of the future heavenly joy.  It is already a part of faith, and is grasped through hope, even though not yet manifest.

And around this field is a golden ring, to signify that such bliss in heaven is endless, and more precious than all joys and goods, just as gold is the most valuable and precious metal.

May Christ, our dear Lord, be with your spirit until the life to come.  Amen.

 

 

 

[Luther’s Works – American Edition – Volume 49, pp. 356-357]

 

Kinderbeten: The Origin, Unfolding, and Interpretations of the Silesian Children’s Prayer Revival

 

The origin of this revival came to be connected to the arrival of Swedish soldiers and their daily worship on the parade field because this was also seen providentially. Thus the prayer revival and the soldiers as an answer to prayers for liberation mutually informed one another in the minds of contemporaries. However, this was confused by the interpretation offered by Lutheran Orthodoxy. Pietists, on the other hand, warmly embraced the movement and sought to place it within an apocalyptic interpretation of history, coming closer to the original conflation of the two events. However, both interpretations failed to give appropriate significance to reports that the revival had begun in the mountains before the Swedes’ arrival. It is suggested here that prayer is the key interpretive grid. Subsequent historians have missed this interpretation largely because of their own presuppositions against divine intervention.

More here.

Silesian Peace Churches: Baroque forms and complex imagery used in unique ways to convey concepts of Protestant theology

from UNESCO World Heritage Centre:

The Churches of Peace in Jawor and Świdnica, the largest timber-framed religious buildings in Europe, were built in the former Silesia in the mid-17th century, amid the religious strife that followed the Peace of Westphalia. Constrained by the physical and political conditions, the Churches of Peace bear testimony to the quest for religious freedom and are a rare expression of Lutheran ideology in an idiom generally associated with the Catholic Church.

Churches of Peace in Jawor and Swidnica

Justification for Inscription

Criterion iii The Churches of Peace are outstanding testimony to an exceptional act of tolerance on the part of the Catholic Habsburg Emperor towards Protestant communities in Silesia in the period following the Thirty Years’ War in Europe. Criterion iv As a result of conditions imposed by the Emperor the Churches of Peace required the builders, to implement pioneering constructional and architectural solutions of a scale and complexity unknown ever before or since in wooden architecture. The success may be judged by their survival to the present day. Criterion vi The Churches of Peace bear exceptional witness to a particular political development in Europe in the 17th century of great spiritual power and commitment.

The Churches of Peace are outstanding testimony to an exceptional act of tolerance on the part of the Catholic Habsburg Emperor towards Protestant communities in Silesia in the period following the Thirty Years’ War in Europe. As a result of conditions imposed by the emperor, the Churches of Peace required the builders to implement pioneering constructional and architectural solutions of a scale and complexity unknown in wooden architecture. The success may be judged by their survival to the present day.

The Thirty Years’ War in Europe ended with the Treaty of Westphalia (1648), which upheld the principle of cuius regio eius religio , i.e. the faith professed by the ruler was obligatory for his subjects. At that time Silesia was part of the Catholic Habsburg monarchy. In most of the province Protestants were persecuted and deprived of the right and possibility to practise their faith. Through the agency of the Lutheran king of Sweden, the emperor finally allowed (1651-52) the erection of three churches, henceforth known as the Churches of Peace, in Silesian principalities under direct Habsburg rule – in Głogów, which ceased to exist in the 18th century, Jawor, and Swidnica in the south-west part of present-day Poland.

Unlike the Baroque Roman Catholic churches of Silesia, the Churches of Peace do not represent a self-confident mission-oriented religion, triumphant in its victory over heretics, but rather they embody a place of refuge for an oppressed religious minority that wanted to assert its faith, to remain conscious of its individuality, and to preserve the communal cult of its traditions and practices. Stability and durability were achieved by means of an efficient structural system and careful use of traditional techniques in handling the materials and in connecting the individual timbers with one another. The Churches of Peace are among the latest examples of an architecture that combines post-and-beam construction (building with one-piece wall-high posts) with the use of halved joints; the structural framework of regularly placed uprights and horizontal connecting rails is reinforced by means of diagonal crossed struts that are inserted in the posts and rails in a way that makes shifting of the structural framework impossible. As post-and-beam buildings, the Churches of Peace are part of a European tradition that goes back to the 12th century and continued into the 18th century. The churches in Jawor and Swidnica differ in the character of their floor plans. Both have three aisles, both terminated in a polygonal east end, but whereas in Jawor the eastern end is still a true chancel, in Swidnica it is only the formal remembrance of such: its function has become that of a sacristy.

The Lutheran Church of Peace in Jawor was designed by the architect Albert von Sabisch and constructed by the master carpenter Andreas Gamper from Jawor in 1654-55. Located outside the town, the church is surrounded by a park, the former graveyard, with the original layout of tree-lined alleys. The auxiliary buildings occupy a quarter of the site. The church is in the form of a basilica with one nave, two aisles and a presbytery. The building is timber-framed, filled with vertical wooden chips wrapped in straw and plastered with clay. It is covered with shingle roofs. The bell tower was erected in 1707 on a rectangular plan. The interior has two tiers of principal galleries and two tiers of auxiliary galleries, added in the 18th century. The polychrome decoration consists of ornaments in white and blue and 143 biblical scenes with inscriptions. The paintings, inspired by Mathias Merian, were executed by Georg Flegel. Similar decoration is also on the auxiliary galleries, and the decor is supplemented by cartouches bearing coats of arms. The high altar (1672) is a multistoreyed structure executed by the workshop of Michael Schneider of Landshut.

The Lutheran Church of Peace in Swidnica was designed by the same architect as the Church of Jawor, Albert von Sabisch, and built by master carpenters Andreas Gamper and Kaspar König in 1656-57. North of the town centre, it was incorporated into the outer ring of fortifications in the mid-18th century. The auxiliary buildings include the head pastor’s residence, the vicarage and two schools. The church is in the form of a basilica with a transept and four tiers of galleries. Its plan is close to a Greek cross. The polychrome decoration of the interior, started in 1693 under the direction of Christian Sussenbach, was inspired by the Bible. The high altar was executed in 1752 by the sculptor Gottfried August Hoffman, replacing an old altarpiece, and he also built the pulpit. The main organ was built by Christoph Klose.

Source: UNESCO/CLT/WHC

Historical Description

The Thirty Years’ War in Europe ended with the Treaty of Westphalia (1648), which upheld the principle of cuius regio eius religio, ie the faith professed by the ruler was obligatory for his subjects. At that time Silesia was a part of the Catholic Habsburg monarchy. In most of the province Protestants were persecuted and deprived of the right and possibility to practise their faith. Through the agency of the Lutheran king of Sweden, the Emperor finally allowed (1651-52) the erection of three churches, henceforth known as the Churches of Peace, in Silesian principalities under direct Habsburg rule in Glogow (Glogau), which ceased to exist in the 18th century, Jawor (Jauer), and Swidnica (Schweidnitz) in the south-west part of present-day Poland. The Emperor’s consent was, however, given upon conditions that were difficult to comply with. The churches had to be built exclusively of perishable materials (wood and clay), located outside city walls, and built in a limited period of time. These restrictions, together with the need to provide adequate space for large crowds of worshippers, forced the architect, Albrecht von Sabisch (1610-88), a prominent master-builder and fortification designer active in Wroclaw, to implement pioneering constructional and architectural solutions of a scale and complexity unknown ever before or since in wooden architecture. The timber-framed structures of enormous scale and complexity were assembled. The Churches of Peace, as they are still called today, were to be as inconspicuous as possible in the townscape; they were to be the refuge of a legally disadvantaged and only reluctantly tolerated minority, whose role as outsiders should be evident in the location of the churches outside the protective city walls.

The first permit was given to Glogow (1651) and the site was located 300m outside the city walls. Building started quickly and the first service was held in October 1652, but the church was destroyed by a violent storm in the summer of 1654. A new church was built the following year, but this burnt down in 1758 and was then replaced by a brick building. The permit for the other two churches was given in 1652. The church of Jawor was built in 1654-55. In Swidnica a temporary structure (Gotteshüttlein, God’s Hut) was built in 1652 and the actual construction was able to take place in 1656-57, thanks to the donation of Count Hans Heinrich von Hochberg and support from the Lutheran magistrate of Swidnica. A new sacristy was erected in 1695 and private pews were built by noble families in the early 18th century. Several auxiliary buildings were added to the ensemble, including the residences of the pastor and the vicars, a Latin school, and a German school. The two churches were designed as basilicas with built-in galleries but their plans and spatial arrangements differed. In their décor, integrated into the architectural framework, exuberant Baroque forms and complex imagery were used in a truly unique way to convey concepts of Protestant theology. During the Silesian War, Swidnica was under siege on several occasions, and the hostilities resulted in the destruction of the sacristy and structural damage to the northern wall. All the damage was repaired by 1763.

Source: UNESCO World Heritage; Advisory Body Evaluation